Monday, October 21, 2013

Singular Thinking by Linda S. Glaz




Singular Thinking by Linda S. Glaz

When sitting in an office 24/7, which a lot of us do for the most part, we have to consider that we are being very singular in many aspects.
A lot of writers are outgoing, but then must sit behind a computer for a good share of their day.
Let’s look at a couple things:
First, writing requires life experiences to be able to create ‘real’ characters.
Second, it’s imperative for writers to interact with other people in order to understand what’s going on in the world. And different social media formats don’t replace actual interaction with humans.
As writers, we want that time with our computers. Where else can a person hunt and peck, creating imaginary lives, personalities, and scenarios that will come alive on someone’s ebook or in a printed book?
There needs to be a balance that allows us to keep living as well as bring that incredible life to our characters which requires the long hours on the computer.
How do you balance your time as a writer? What do you do to be sure you are interacting with ‘normal’ people?
How many hours a week/day do you give to your craft?
Do you allow time to learn new aspects of your craft through critique groups, classes, etc.?
OR, are you the 24/7 writer who never lifts his head from the sand to see what’s going on in the world around you?
 

Saturday, October 5, 2013

A Word or an Expression

Has a word or an expression just snapped you awake enough that you thought:
I could write a story around that?
I've been listening to the news or a conversation and suddenly, one word will wake me up. I can see a story as clearly as if I'd already written it.
Have you had one of those 'aha' moments that woke you up?
Wanna share?


Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Too Many Folks Too Anxious


There are too many folks too anxious to submit before they’re ready.

I’ve just finished most of my conference schedule for the year, and I have to admit that I’ve seen folks signing up for one appointment after another with first this agent and then that editor. Too many appointments, not enough time in the classroom. After all, that’s why they’re at the conference, right? Apparently not. Because instead of learning their craft, they seem to simply want to shop around manuscripts…some ready…most are not.

I would think after spending anywhere from $500-well over a thousand dollars, a writer would want to learn more about the craft.

Sorry, sitting here a tad frustrated that I saw so many writers with a lot of potential doing nothing but shopping around a tired old manuscript that hasn’t changed in years when they could benefit themselves by sitting in a classroom learning the craft.

Okay, done ranting, but I fear I’ll see the same folks next year doing the same, and they have too much potential to be stuck in a rut.